The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently wrote:

"The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine and the Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network, a collaboration of government and veterinary diagnostic laboratories, are investigating the potential association between reports of canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs and certain pet foods the animals consumed, containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. Canine DCM is a disease of a dog’s heart muscle and often results in congestive heart failure. In cases that are not linked to genetics, heart function may improve with appropriate veterinary treatment and dietary modification if caught early."

Brackett Street Veterinary Clinic has won the "Best Pet Care" category of the The Portland Phoenix's Best of Portland awards for the third year in a row!

We would like to send a special thank you to all the readers and loyal clients in the area that voted for us. We truly do strive to provide the best veterinary care possible, and are so appreciative of your support!

best of portland 2015 logo   best of portland 2016 logo 250px   best of portland 2017 logo 250px

Our Brackett West location has been officialy open for a year, and we're celebrating during the week of October 30-November 3, 2017

Stop by Brackett West Veterinary Clinic for some birthday celebrations, including:

  • Brackett West Veterinary Clinic Turns One!Raffles and prizes
  • Jen Sawyer Photography doing pet photos from 10am-2pm that Monday & Friday
  • Pet photo contest with the winner getting a gift card to Planet Dog!
  • Snacks for pets and people
  • And more!

We hope to see you and your pets then! More details are coming soon.

Learn more about our second location, Brackett West Veterinary Clinic.

Ever since recreational marijuana was legalized in Maine earlier this year, we have seen a number of pets affected by marijuana toxicity.

Marijuana ingestion is very common and can cause a variety of clinical signs, including neurological problems (incoordination, stupor, dilated pupils), gastrointestinal issues (vomiting and diarrhea), urinary incontinence, and decreased heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature.

Signs can last up to 96 hours post exposure, and can occur with variable levels of ingestion. Other toxins can cause similar signs, so it's important to call your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet is exhibiting these signs or has ingested any form of marijuana.